Tag Archives: New South Wales

Electric Run – Sydney

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Electric Run is the World’s Premier Nighttime 5k run/walk experience, where the participants are an integrated part of the show. Featuring immersive “Lands” of light and sound that transport the participant into an electric wonderland, Electric Run promises to transport the mind, body and soul to a new world in a healthy and drug-free way. Participants are encouraged to join in on the art by lighting up with glow sticks, LEDs and anything else their imagination can conjure up.

WHEN / WHERE: Sydney Olympic Park on November 16th, 2013 at 8:00PM – 12:00 AM.

 

COST / REGISTRATION:

Teams of 4 or more

55.00 per person “Early Bird” registration until 5th September at 11:59 pm
60.00 per person regular registration until 24th October at 11:59pm
65.00 per person late registration until 7th November at 11:59pm
70.00 per person final registration until the day of the event

Individual Runners/Walkers

60.00 per person “Early Bird” registration until 5th September at 11:59 pm
65.00 Per person regular registration until 24th October at 11:59pm
70.00 per person late registration until 7th November at 11:59pm
75.00 per person final registration until the day of the event

**Creating a team does not secure spots for all 4 members, each team member needs to register BEFORE registration fills up!

 

PACKAGE COLLECTION

Wednesday, 13th November 11:00am – 6:00pm

Wynyard Park in the CBD
Margaret St,
Sydney, NSW 2000

Thursday, 14th November 10:00am – 7:00pm
Wynyard Park in the CBD
Margaret St,
Sydney NSW 2000

Friday, 15th November 8:00am – 6:00pm
Wynyard Park In the CBD
Margaret St.
Sydney NSW 2000

COURSE MAP
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For more information go to http://www.electricrunaus.com.au/sydney/
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Legends Football League: “The Journey”

By Michael McGill ( @MickSportsNews )

The fireworks were flashing, the music was pumping and the crowd were on their feet cheering. It was June 2012 and the American LFL All-Stars were playing an exhibition game in Brisbane. Sitting in the stands that night were Brooklyn Jackson and her sister who went along to watch some hard hitting women’s sport. On the way home Brooklyn’s sister said ‘You should do that!’, and they both laughed it off. When they arrived home Brooklyn googled the LFL to see what it was all about. She came across a facebook link that mentioned the upcoming New South Wales LFL trials. Two days later she flew down to Sydney.

Pretty courageous stuff considering Brooklyn had only played sport at school for the social aspect and never really pursued it once she left. So here she was lining up with over 60 athletes in Acer Arena at Homebush. She went through all the required tests and drills however when it came time to announce the successful girls she did not make the cut and missed out on selection.

Waking up the next morning Brooklyn set herself a goal to try again once she was in shape and could prove her worth. It was four days later when she heard about a local Sydney ladies gridiron league that were looking for players so she hooked up with the Bondi team. Considering she had exercised a total of three hours for the whole year it was a surprise that she made it through the first training session with the team. She stated, “It was pretty intense and intimidating amongst such established athletes’.

Her next step was to find a nutritionist to keep her on track. So in the space of a month she went from no training at all to 2-3 nights a week with the Bondi team along with three sprint training sessions for speed. This went on for four months as she stepped up her training to six days a week.

One of the Bondi coaches was Michael Vrcelj who said of Brooklyn, ‘With a white-hot focus and determination to compete and succeed, she would have been elite at anything – this sport just happens to have chosen her, and she thrives on the physicality demanded. Her mental and physical transformations over the past year have been amazing. To quote my old football coach, Brookie epitomizes the, “If it is to be, it is up to me” attitude’.

It was during this time that Brooklyn joined Hybrid Athletic-Development to mould her body into peak physical condition. Within 12 weeks she made some incredible body transformations and was called up to train with the NSW Surge LFL squad.

Joe Kormanyos from Hybrid Athletic-Development had the following to say, ‘Brooklyn lives and breathes training. From novice trainer to a chiseled athlete, she epitomizes what hard work fuelled by big dreams can achieve. It has been a true privilege to guide her on her journey’. Brooklyn says of Joe, ‘He kills me everyday. If I am not training with him, he is calling me up and checking on my diet and where my head is at’. Good friend and training partner, Shani Sleeman added, ‘She’s motivated, a goal setter, a hard worker and the most hyperactive (in a good way) individual I have ever met”.  

The LFL call up was from NSW Surge coaches Jason Gaffey and Teren Tan. Brooklyn was so happy that she rang her family while crying tears of joy down the line. “Receiving that email was the best day of my life, it made me want to work even harder’.

1111111111 Brooklyn initially felt nervous training with the Surge however she now feels right at home. The next step was attending the final trials where more new athletes stepped up to tryout for a coveted spot in the squad. The LFL Commissioner Mitch Mortaza was in attendance. Brooklyn said of the day, ‘I was extremely nervous however I knew that I had done everything possible over the previous 10 months to make sure I was part of the NSW Surge’. She felt triumphant on hearing that she had made the squad saying, ‘It made me realize it was just the beginning of the next episode. There is nothing more I want at this time of my life’.

Brooklyn continued, ‘Never give up on something you can not go a day without thinking about. Since I first saw it, I dreamt it and now I live and breathe it, so hopefully soon I will become it’.

NSW Surge sessions are intense. Every player is chasing their dreams and the chance to be part of the inaugural Australian LFL season. It is pushing them all to a higher level of athleticism and discipline.  Brooklyn thrives under pressure and likes to push herself to the limit and she never thought she would get this far, so every day is a bonus. She adds, ‘Being around such amazing driven people everyday is an absolute pleasure’.

Teren Tan the offensive coach for the Surge is full of praise for Brooklyn, mentioning, ‘”Brooklyn’s journey up until this point is one that should ignite the fire in any potential athlete to set your sights and not stop until you reach your goals. New sport, new style of training and a thirst to succeed can have you setting some vast goals for yourself and Brooklyn keeps doing it and  achieving goals then setting new ones. She is a student of the game who consistently gets better.”

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Fellow Surge teammate Bonnie Gillespie loves having her in the team, ‘Brooklyn is a strong individual that hates the words I can’t! She puts her all into everything she does and she never gives up! She pushes others to reach their goals and that is what I call I true achiever’. Her short term goal is to make the final NSW Surge team that runs out onto the gridiron this December. Long term she wants to be an offensive weapon and protect her Quarterback.

When asked what she would say to other girls considering the Legends Football League she gets excited and says, ‘DO IT! It is the best decision I have ever made. Not just physically but mentally it has made me a stronger woman’.

Brooklyn has come a long way since that night she watched the All-Stars game in June last year. The transformation has been incredible. What you see now is a fit, confident and dedicated young lady who is at her athletic peak.

Make sure you get out to an LFL game this summer. The NSW Surge first game is on Saturday 7th December against the Queensland Brigade. It is sure to take the Country by storm. Just like Brooklyn these women train hard and are sure to entertain the crowds with their athleticism and skill.

As Bill Lawry Would Say: ‘It’s All Happening’

By Daniel Cousens ( @DanCuzns )

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So for once, instead of struggling to come up with a topic to write about, this week there has been so much going on that I couldn’t decide which topic to pick. Therefore, as the fence sitter than I am, I figured I’ll just touch on a bit of everything and then reward myself with a weekend away.

To start, let’s talk about the Origin decider. The Queensland streak remains alive after they hung on to win by two and NSW have to wait another year to try to end the drought. Those who follow me on Twitter or Facebook know that I, like many others, think the biggest issue for NSW was halfback Mitchell Pearce.

The only people I have seen defending Pearce have been Roosters fans and even Roosters fans have been divided on it. I am not questioning Pearce’s heart or effort levels. I think he desperately wants to be the best player he can and gave it his all yet again, but he quite simply isn’t good enough. He is a good defender for his position but NSW need a halfback that can create points and that is something Pearce has not done in five years playing for NSW.

His kicking game is below par and he doesn’t have the dynamic passing or running game. He also didn’t take control of the direction of the team, which lead to many plays that looked like they had no plan.

The argument that a halfback needs a forward pack going forward to be able to perform doesn’t hold water here either as the NSW pack won the arm wrestle. NSW had every opportunity to win game 3 as well as getting the better of the forward back for the last two years in general. Pearce may well be a great guy, but he has had more than enough chances and it’s time NSW make the move they should have made before this series. It’s certainly a popular opinion and I’m not saying anything that hasn’t been said elsewhere over and over, but enough is enough and it’s time the Pearce experiment ends. He just isn’t that good.

Onto the Ashes, where Australia lost the First Test but there were certainly a number of positives to take out of it. From a neutral standpoint it was one of the most entertaining and gripping Tests I have ever watched and whilst Australia ended up on the losing end, it gave me belief that we can absolutely make this a competitive series.

Darren Lehmann’s decision to play Ashton Agar instantly paid off with one of the greatest moments in Test history, with a 19 year old Agar, batting 11 and with Australia in dire straits, getting to 98 (alongside a tremendous knock by Phil Hughes) before holing out trying to get his century.

There is clearly a concern with the top order, which hopefully will be rectified as the series moves forward, but I can’t remember a tail that so consistently wags. Our bowlers are honestly not that much worse at batting than our specialist batsmen are. Which isn’t really a compliment to our batsmen, but is still praise for our bowlers.

As I write this the team for the Second Test was announced and so I had to quickly rewrite this bit about selections for the match. Cowan was axed as expected and replaced by Usman Khawaja, who was the likely replacement. Mitchell Starc also makes way with Ryan Harris getting the nod over Jackson Bird as the replacement fast bowler. Cowan had to go and Starc has been a bit down on form so neither was unexpected. I wasn’t sure whether Harris, Bird or a second spinner would come in depending on the conditions and it’s hard to argue with Ryan Harris getting the nod.

But either way, I’m no longer feeling as down about our chances for the series as I was before the First Test, which is saying something considering we are now officially trailing in the series.

Also a quick point on the whole DRS and Stuart Broad saga. First of all, I think we need to be a bit careful to put all the blame on England, when we got a bit lucky ourselves in the first innings with Agar and the fact that Clarke continues to misuse the review system. That said, Broad should have walked and the fact that he didn’t absolutely makes him a dirty cheat.  Also, the on field umpires were atrocious for both sides and this wouldn’t be an issue if they actually did their job at a level even near competent. Aleem Dar is one of the worst umpires I can remember and it baffles me how he continues to get such big matches. He is like cricket’s Jason Robinson.

Onto Le Tour. Whilst some of the individual stages have been exciting, is it just me or is the fact that Chris Froome is so dominant making the race kind of boring. It’s hard to stay up at night knowing the result is already over barring injury. That’s not to take anything away from Froome himself. He was expected to do this and he is delivering in spades and proving that he probably would have won Le Tour last year as well if his team had let him.

I also think raising speculation of him cheating as the media have been doing is ridiculous. It’s an unfortunately side effect of the sport’s history, but Froome has done nothing to suggest he is cheating besides being really, really good. I’d like to think he isn’t cheating because neither are his competitors anymore. However, should he end up in a doping scandal at any stage, it would be tragic and would be another nail into the coffin of the sport for many people.

We also are currently being graced with the presence of English Premier League champions Manchester United, who are here to play an A-League All Stars team this weekend. Then next Wednesday, my beloved Liverpool will be taking on the Melbourne Victory and I am fortunate enough to be traveling to Melbourne to watch the game. I’ve never seen Liverpool play and I’ve never been to a sporting event at the MCG, so to say I’m excited would be an understatement.

I hope to write about the experience next week, so stay tuned for that and remember, ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’.

Queensland win 8 Straight

By Brad Eveleigh ( @Brad_Eveleigh )

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The Queensland Maroons have won Game 3 of the 2013 Rugby League State of Origin series defeating New South Wales 12-10 to clinch yet another series title.

With the series locked at 1-1 having both teams win at their home ground, it was down to game 3 to see who would take home the prestigious shield and a year of territorial bragging rights.

It was Queensland who collected the honors again this year to make it an amazing 8 straight series wins and continue to live up to the reputation as the greatest team in Origin history.

The Maroons took an 8-0 lead with a try to Johnathen Thurston, who converted his own try in the 10th minute, and converted a penalty not long after. A smart move in such an important game having a score line set for the opposition having to score twice to overtake the lead, no matter what part of the game it is.

New South Wales reacted with an unconverted try to James McManus in the 26th minute to reduce the deficit to just 4, as the conversion by James Maloney was unsuccessful.

Both teams when to the sheds at the halftime break evenly poised and with a respectable 8-4 score line.

With a quarter of the game remaining, Justin Hodges crossed for the Maroons to extent the lead to 12-4 formulating an exciting final period to the game.

A converted try to Trent Merrin with 8 minutes remaining on the clock gave the Blues a glimmer of hope to muster a late win, but it wasn’t to be.

Queensland were on the brink of extending the lead in the final moments however they were denied by the interference of a pitch invader. The pending try was disallowed but a Maroon scrum feed to resume play was enough to wind down the clock and keep the Blues deep in their own territory.

The first half penalty conversion for Queensland turned out to be a critical call in the match as they were able to hold on to their slim 2 point margin.

After the match, Queensland’s Brent Tate was awarded the Man of the Match honors along with the Peter Jackson Medal (for players player) and the Dick “Tosser” Turner Medal for playing 20 Origin Matches.

Tate said that winning the Tosser Turner Medal was what has been his driving force to keep playing.

Pic: Stuffnz

State of Origin Teams – Game 3

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New South Wales.

  1. Josh Dugan
  2. James McManus
  3. Michael Jennings
  4. Josh Morris
  5. Brett Morris
  6. James Maloney
  7. Mitchell Pearce
  8. James Tamou
  9. Robbie Farah
  10. Paul Gallen (C)
  11. Ryan Hoffman
  12. Luke Lewis
  13. Greg Bird
  14. Anthony Watmough
  15. Andrew Fifita
  16. Trent Merrin
  17. Josh Reynolds
  18. (Was McManus – Replaced Jayrrd Hayne at #2)
  19. Boyd Cordner
  20. Aaron Woods

 

Queensland

  1. Billy Slater
  2. Darius Boyd
  3. Greg Inglis
  4. Justin Hodges
  5. Brent Tate
  6. Jonathen Thurston
  7. Cooper Cronk
  8. Matthew Scott
  9. Cameron Smith (C)
  10. Nate Myles
  11. Chris McQueen
  12. Sam Thaiday
  13. Cory Parker
  14. Daly Cherry-Eveans
  15. Ben Te’o
  16. Matt Gillett
  17. Jacob Lillyman
  18. Will Chambers

State of Origin Teams – Game 2

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New South Wales.

  1. Josh Dugan
  2. Brett Morris
  3. Michael Jennings
  4. Josh Morris
  5. Nathan Merritt
  6. James Maloney
  7. Mitchell Pearce
  8. Paul Gallen (C)
  9. Robbie Farah
  10. Aaron Woods
  11. Ryan Hoffman
  12. Luke Lewis
  13. Greg Bird
  14. Andrew Fifita
  15. Trent Merrin
  16. Josh Reynolds
  17. Anthony Watmough

 

Queensland

  1. Billy Slater
  2. Darius Boyd
  3. Greg Inglis
  4. Justin Hodges
  5. Brent Tate
  6. Jonathen Thurston
  7. Cooper Cronk
  8. Matthew Scott
  9. Cameron Smith (C)
  10. Nate Myles
  11. Chris McQueen
  12. Sam Thaiday
  13. Cory Parker
  14. Daly Cherry-Eveans
  15. Ben Te’o
  16. Matt Gillett
  17. Josh Papalii
  18. Martin Kennedy (Standby)

Assessing the negatives of Origin Football

By Brad Eveleigh ( @Brad_Eveleigh )

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It is the eve of Game 1 in the 2013 Rugby League State of Origin series.

Dubbed as the most anticipated series ever – which is what it is labeled as every year.

New South Wales have the double home ground advantage at ANZ Stadium this year as the Queensland juggernaut look to make it 8-straight series wins.

Year after year, prior to Game 1, the endless banter crosses from both sides of the boarder. Everything from wins, to history, to players, to how may teeth you have, it just goes on and on.

The most publicised and sensitive debate is player eligibility. Who rightly belongs in a Blue or Maroon jersey?

The difference between having one of the greatest player of all time wearing the wrong colour can result in a generation of losses to those claiming to be “screwed over”.

It causes confusion globally as to what the rules really are, especially when people from other countries play for either the Toads of the Roaches. To be selected for Origin football you must be classed as “Australian”. I highlight that word, as the theory can be very confusing.

As and example, Jarryd Hayne has represented Fiji (and New South Wales), Tonie Carroll has played for New Zealand (and Queensland), the list goes on.

It all comes down to the age you moved here, where you played juniors, where you first played representative football blah blah blah. Did you know that one of the all time Origin greats for QLD, Gordon Tallis, played his first representative game for NSW?

I want to focus on the international players making themselves available for Origin. That’s right, they have a choice. Some like Sam Kasiano have stayed loyal to New Zealand, others, like Josh Papalii have not.

We need to raise a few questions as to why the loyalty is being brushed quicker than water off a ducks back. Why would you turn your back on your homeland?

The answer is firstly the opportunity to play representative football at the highest level. Yes, International representation is the highest level but the quality of football is the difference.

Secondly, players from the likes of Tonga, Samoa etc don’t have that high quality, frequency and popularity like State of Origin. I watched Game 2 of last year’s Origin series at a Bar in Barcelona, Spain. There’s no way that would happen for a Cook Islands vs. Papua New Guinea match. Players want to be in the spotlight and play in the best games. The dangling carrot is too large for them to ignore.

It will only get worse over time as (easily) over 60% of players in the National Youth Competition (Holden Cup) are of Polynesian heritage.

Keep the above debate in mind as I move to another problem that arises at Origin time; the BYE.

The weekend just gone, Round 12, of the NRL Telstra Premiership had a total of 4 games with the remaining 8 teams putting their feet up to accommodate the Origin period.

Last night, a depleted Brisbane Broncos outfit was crushed at home to the last placed New Zealand Warriors 56 – 18.

Was it a surprise? In round 23 it would be, absolutely! During the Origin period? Not a surprise at all. In fact, the Warriors were the favorites to win. This was due to Brisbane missing a large chunk of their squad who are in the Queensland team.

The National Rugby League have put the clubs in a “catch 22” situation. Players are being rewarded for their playing ability with Origin representation but their club is significantly weaker and will be punished for the premiership race in their absence.

There have been suggestions of having a stand-alone weekend just for the State of Origin so the clubs can remain at full strength. I think this would be an unsuccessful move as the average punter wants to see more than 1 game of footy in an 11 day period.

I have an idea that would (to a degree) solve both the eligibility and skeleton squads at club level. If not solve, then work towards change for the better.

My theory is this:

Keep the State of Origin as its traditional Wednesday fixture and give every NRL club a BYE on the weekend that follows.

During that NRL weekend off, Australia and New Zealand would host a Pacific Nations Tournament consisting of Papua New Guinea – Cook Islands – Samoa – Fiji – Tonga – New Zealand North Island – New Zealand South Island – Australian Prime Ministers teams.

The National Youth Competition would also play their Under 20’s State of Origin series during that weekend.

These teams would play a 3 week tournament on the weekend that follows the Wednesday Origin. The structure of that tournament would be for a discussion at another time.

This would not only provide at least 5 games over the weekend (what the Rugby League fans want) but International rivalries and more frequent representation for those countries who are currently limited to a minimal amount.

Would this tempt those who choose to play Origin over their home country to reconsider? To wear their home colours and have the honour of representing their people? I think so.

It would also introduce the young players from the NYC into representative games at a younger age and give them experience, which will make them better players when they make it to the NRL. Over all result – a stronger NRL competition.

Imagine Fiji vs. Cook Islands at Allianz Stadium; Samoa vs. Tonga at Suncorp Stadium; NZ North vs. NZ South in Wellington; Australia’s PM vs. PNG in Canberra. The massive amounts of multiculturalism that forms these great nations would come together and celebrate in the name of Rugby League whilst enjoying their sporting rivalry.

Low ticket prices and more merchandise sales will create a financial domino effect into club membership growth because more people are being involved in the game through culture.

At the end of it all, the players go back to their club, the normal Premiership rounds recommence, the clubs are at full strength and the race fore September is back on.

Just a thought…